Trees

Heavy rain will lead to poor water quality

Monday 26 February, 2007
Heavy rain following fires that devastated parts of the Goulburn Broken Catchment could result in poor water quality.

Heavy rain following fires that devastated parts of the Goulburn Broken Catchment could result in poor water quality.

With above average rainfall predicted in coming months, the Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Authority is warning landowners to be aware of poor water quality in rivers and streams.

Manager, Strategic River Health, Wayne Tennant said poor water quality would impact on drinking water for stock and domestic supply.

"With little riparian vegetation remaining in some areas along river banks, including the Goulburn and Jamieson Rivers and Ryans Creek, there is no filter to prevent sediments and pollutants entering the waterways," Mr Tennant said.

"Regeneration of the vegetation is the only effective long- term solution to erosion and poor water quality.

"We encourage landowners to improve riparian vegetation along river banks wherever possible."

"Research shows barriers and traps do not prevent silt and ash entering rivers.

"Smaller scale works around key sites, where major erosion has occurred or near water supply uptakes, may be useful in times of low flows or rainfall, but would not be effective in times of high flows or heavy rainfall events.

For information on how to monitor water quality visit www.waterwatch.org.au

Landowners who observe discoloured water or ash in waterways are urged to contact their local water authority or the GB CMA on 58 201 110.

Release Ends

For more information contact Anna at Impress Publicity 58 212 651 or Wayne Tennant at GB CMA 58 201 100