Trees

Have your say on improving the health of the Yea River

Tuesday 29 January, 2013
Landholders along the Yea River between Westbridge Rd and the Goulburn River are invited to take part in a project to support and protect the endangered Macquarie Perch.

Landholders along the Yea River between Westbridge Rd and the Goulburn River are invited to take part in a project to support and protect the endangered Macquarie Perch.

Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Authority (CMA) River Health Officer Kirsten Roszak said the Yea River was an important part of the landscape and was once home to an abundant population of the endangered Macquarie Perch.

“We are excited to establish this project along the Yea River and will initially focus on this section of the river, although landholders upstream are  most welcome to get involved too,” Ms Roszak said.

“We have sent letters to people who manage river frontages inviting them to meet with Goulburn Broken CMA staff to gain a better understanding about the river itself and learn how we could work together to find solutions to improve its health.”

Ms Roszak said local people had a unique insight and understanding of the river and she was keen for their input into the design of the proposed works program.

“Once we have established a relationship with a landholder and done a site assessment of the river frontage, we can determine what types of works would be best suited to that section of the river,” she said.

“These works may include fencing and/or revegetation – there are a range of options available and we work hard to be flexible and meet land managers’ needs.”

Ms Roszak said the meeting would provide an opportunity to understand what was important to the landholder about the river.

“We can look at matters such as water access for stock or, if someone loves birds for example, we have a range of plants that can be planted to specifically attract them,” she said. “There will also be an opportunity to discuss the financial support available to carry out these on-ground activities.”

Ms Roszak said similar projects were underway along King Parrot Creek and Hollands Creek and there was already evidence that native fish populations were increasing as a result.

“The real key to these projects’ success is the support and input of landholders along those water frontages and we look forward to meeting and working with Yea River landholders to achieve similar results,” she said.

To arrange a time to meet Goulburn Broken staff, please phone 5736 0100.  For further information about this project visit www.gbcma.vic.gov.au, where a Frequently Asked Questions Fact Sheet can be downloaded.

A Macquarie perch