Trees

Barbed wire snares local endangered species

Thursday 22 July, 2010
"Rebada" is one very lucky Squirrel Glider. Cut from a barbed wire fence next to the Goulburn Broken CMA office, the adventurous little glider is now well on the way to making a speedy recovery with thanks to help from Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Authority (CMA) staff member Keith Ward and local wildlife rescuer Katherine Lohse.

"Rebada" is one very lucky Squirrel Glider. Cut from a barbed wire fence next to the Goulburn Broken CMA office, the adventurous little glider is now well on the way to making a speedy recovery with thanks to help from Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Authority (CMA) staff member Keith Ward and local wildlife rescuer Katherine Lohse.

The lucky Squirrel Glider has been named "Rebada" after Rebecca Curren and Sharada Ramumurthy from the Department of Sustainability and Environment (DSE) in Melbourne who spotted the glider at 11:00am whilst parking their car prior to a meeting.

"It was lucky that no predator had attacked the glider at this late time of the morning. Squirrel Gliders are listed as an endangered species under the Victorian Flora & Fauna Guarantee Act 1998, meaning that they are considered to be facing a very high risk of extinction in the wild." Said Goulburn Broken CMA staff member and newly titled wildlife rescuer, Keith Ward.
Rebada is the 3rd Squirrel Glider that the local wildlife carer, Katherine Lohse, has received with injuries from entanglement with barbed wire.

"I am currently looking after some Grey-headed Flying Foxes that have also become entangled on barbed wire fences" said Ms Lohse.

"Prior to Rebada I have cared for other wildlife species such as Boobook Owls, Barn Owls, Tawny Frogmouths, Kookaburra and Magpies that have been entangled in barbed wire. Sadly, all but one of these birds had to be euthanized or died due to the severity of their injuries".

When entangled in barbwire, the animal struggles to try and free themselves, this causes further damage (broken bones, ligament damage, dislocation of wings, abrasions/cuts), and if the animal is not freed or eaten by a predator, it will either die of stress or malnourishment/dehydration. It is a slow and painful death.

Release Ends

For further information please contact:

Amanda McClaren
Communications and Marketing Manager
t: 03 5820 1117 / 0459 023 640 e: amandam@gbcma.vic.gov.au