Goulburn Broken Wetlands

In the Goulburn Broken Catchment over 2000 natural wetlands have been recorded and cover approximately 86,000 hectares. These wetlands include large permanent lakes, floodplain billabongs, small spring soaks, alpine bogs and shallow freshwater depressions.

The filling and drying cycles of many of these wetlands have been impacted by: levees; floodplain development; stream regulation; surface and groundwater extraction; and land clearing. This has had a significant impact on their health and functioning and the native plants and animals that depend upon them for short and long term survival.

Environmental water is currently delivered to five of the natural wetlands in the catchment (excluding Barmah Forest). These are:

Moodie Swamp: A 180 hectare cane grass wetland on the upper Broken Creek floodplain. The wetlands provides important Brolga breeding habitat and supports a population of the nationally threatened Rigid Water Milfoil.

Moodie Swamp – photo gallery

Reedy Swamp:  A 130 hectare wetland on the urban fringe north of Shepparton. The wetland is an important feeding and breeding site for waterbirds including threatened and migratory species.      

Reedy Swamp Photo Gallery

Doctors Swamp: A 200 hectare red gum swamp near Murchison. The wetland is considered to be one of the most intact red gum swamps in Victoria and supports a diverse range of native wetland plants and provides important habitat for waterbirds.

Doctors Swamp Photo Gallery

Kinnairds Wetland: A 96 hectare red gum swamp east of Numurkah at the southern end of the Muckatah depression. The wetland is an important feeding and breeding site for waterbirds and supports the largest known Victorian population of the nationally threatened Rigid Water Milfoil.

Kinnairds Swamp Photo Gallery

Black Swamp: A 16.5 hectare red gum swamp east of Wunghnu on the Nine Mile Creek floodplain. The wetland is an important feeding and breeding site for waterbirds and supports a large population of the nationally threatened River swamp Wallaby-grass.

Black Swamp Photo Gallery

Environmental water deliveries to these wetlands aim to restore more natural filling and drying cycles.

Priority watering actions include:

  • Filling the wetlands to variable depths in autumn and spring to:
    • improve the  diversity of wetland  vegetation communities
    • provide breeding and feeding habitat for waterbirds and frogs
    • maintain populations of threatened plant species including Rigid Water Milfoil and River swamp Wallaby-grass
  • Maintaining wetland water levels in spring and early summer so breeding waterbirds don’t abandon their nests.
  • Promoting wetland drying in summer to maintain vegetation communities

Below are the resources available for download regarding proposed watering actions for the Goulburn Broken Wetlands:

To find out more about how acoustics are helping us monitor the effectiveness of environmental water deliveries to wetlands, click here.

 Any further information regarding proposed watering actions for the Goulburn Broken Wetlands can be obtained by contacting the GB CMA.

Photos of the Goulburn Broken Wetlands 

To view photos of the Goulburn Broken Wetlands, visit our GB CMA Flickr page by clicking on the image below:

   

Videos regarding the Goulburn Broken Wetlands

 To view videos of the Goulburn Broken Wetlands, visit our GB CMA YouTube channel by clicking on the image below:

GBCMA on Flickr GBCMA on YouTube