Valley

Study of Yea and Acheron rivers under way

Thursday 9 May, 2013
The impact on the Yea and Acheron rivers from land management practices, bank erosion and willow invasion will be investigated as part of a geomorphic study being undertaken by consultants Moroka on behalf of the Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Authority (CMA).

The impact on the Yea and Acheron rivers from land management practices, bank erosion and willow invasion will be investigated as part of a geomorphic study being undertaken by consultants Moroka on behalf of the Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Authority (CMA).

Geomorphologists look at how factors, such as stream networks, soil type, wind and vegetation cover, affect the landscape.

Goulburn Broken CMA River Health Officer Kirsten Roszak said the two rivers had been identified as priority waterways because of their high ecological, recreational and production values.

“We know that the health of the Acheron and Yea rivers has been affected by changes to the landscape such as native vegetation clearing, willow invasion and bank erosion. Through this study, we hope to gain a better understanding of these issues, as well as any emerging issues, and to identify strategies and specific management actions to address them,” she said.

For the past two months Moroka consultants have carried out desktop analysis and modelling based on documents and reports such as old parish plans, earlier studies and aerial photographs.

“This week, the consultants visited sites along both rivers ‘ground truthing’ – checking the accuracy – of these records,” Ms Roszak said. “As you can imagine, looking at the parish plans, many of them dating back to the late 1800s and early 1900s, helps us to better understand how these rivers have changed over the years.”

 Ms Roszak said once the consultants had collated and updated the data they would provide a report to the Goulburn Broken CMA identifying factors that affected the rivers in the landscape.
 
“The report will also indicate the extent and nature of the rehabilitation and management options required to reduce any negative impacts of geomorphic change, such as waterway instability or excessive sediment production, and identify any risk to public infrastructure,” she said.

Findings and recommendations from the geomorphic study, due to be completed in July, will be used by the Goulburn Broken CMA to work co-operatively with land managers to rehabilitate the two rivers.

For more information on the project, or to be involved in the project, please phone the Yea Office on 5736 0100.