Turtle

Special roadside areas to receive TLC

Monday 20 December, 2010
Roadside areas in parts of north-east and northern Victoria are receiving special attention as part of a major conservation project underway in the region.  

Roadside areas in parts of north-east and northern Victoria are receiving special attention as part of a major conservation project underway in the region.  

Seven local councils are undertaking targeted weed control along roadside areas as part of a $3 million Australian Government ‘Caring for Our Country’ project that aims to protect Threatened Grassy Woodlands, one of Australia’s most poorly conserved ecosystems.  

Threatened Grassy Woodlands include; White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely’s Red Gum Woodland, Weeping Myall and Buloke Woodlands. Once widespread throughout eastern and south-eastern Australia, less than five percent remain in good condition.  

North East CMA Threatened Grassy Woodlands Project Officer, Ms Mary Munro, said roadside areas are home to some of the most important Threatened Grassy Woodlands remnant sites in the region.   

“Many key sites occur on Council managed land. We’re delighted that so many Councils are supporting this major conservation project with more than 144 hectares treated so far,” said Mary.  

Wodonga City Council, Indigo Shire Council, Rural City of Wangaratta, Towong Shire Council, Benalla Rural City Council, Murrindindi Shire Council and the Greater Shepparton City Council are working with catchment management authorities to coordinate Chilean Needle Grass and Blackberry control along key roadside areas.  

Ms Munro said weed control in high conservation roadside areas will deliver benefits for the target woodlands and surrounding land and properties.  

“Threatened grassy woodlands are of national significance. They provide much of the seed used to re-vegetate farmland and other modified areas; protect stock, crops and pasture from heat, cold and wind and can provide high intensity, short duration grazing opportunities. They are also essential for the survival of rare and threatened species such as the Superb Parrot, Regent Honeyeater, the Swift Parrot and Squirrel Gliders.”  

The Threatened Grassy Woodlands project is funded by the Australian Government’s ‘Caring for our Country’ initiative and supported by the North East, Goulburn Broken and Murray Catchment Management Authorities, the Victorian Departments of Sustainability and Environment (DSE) and Primary Industries (DPI), the Australian National University, Trust for Nature and the Nature Conservation Trust.