Wheat

Signage warns of potential weed spread

Wednesday 28 September, 2011
The Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Authority (CMA) and the Benalla Rural City Council (BRCC) are encouraging the local community and visitors to the region to prevent the spread of one of the most invasive aquatic weeds in Australia.Cabomba, which is located within Lake Benalla and immediately downstream in the Broken River to Casey's Weir, has potential to impact on other waterways and water bodies should it be transported by either stream flow or unintentional human activities.

The Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Authority (CMA) and the Benalla Rural City Council (BRCC) are encouraging the local community and visitors to the region to prevent the spread of one of the most invasive aquatic weeds in Australia.Cabomba, which is located within Lake Benalla and immediately downstream in the Broken River to Casey's Weir, has potential to impact on other waterways and water bodies should it be transported by either stream flow or unintentional human activities.

Wayne Tennant, Manager of Strategic River Health at the Goulburn Broken CMA said "Cabomba, which is native to South America, is regarded as one of the worst weeds in Australia because of its invasiveness, potential for spread, and economic and environmental impacts."

"While its spread in the local catchment is limited, it has the potential to choke many kilometers of waterways in neighboring catchments" Mr Tennant added.

"The Goulburn Broken CMA and BRCC have been working in partnership with the Department of Primary Industries, Goulburn Murray Water and the Federal Government's Caring for Our Country initiative to reduce the spread and impact of the Lake Benalla incursion over a number of years" said Mr Tennant. "But we also need to reduce the potential for its movement by human activity. "

As part of this process, new signs have been developed and erected in key locations along the Broken River and around Lake Benalla. The signage requests community support in reducing the human movement of the weed. Our community can help prevent the spread of Cabomba by checking and removing all plant fragments from boats, water and fishing equipment before leaving waterways.This would be a positive action to prevent its spread to other valuable waterways.

Cabomba is frequently used in fish tanks and aquariums, as an attractive leaved water plant that is fast-growing. It is most likely that the Lake Benalla incursion is a result of inappropriate disposal of an unwanted fish tank (and its components). Both authorities encourage appropriate disposal of unwanted pest plants and animals, as their impact on the environment can be significant.For more information please contact Goulburn Broken CMA on 5820 1100 or Benalla Rural City Council on 03 5760 2600.

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