Bird

Rubbish Dumping Condemned

Thursday 12 August, 2004
The dumping of rubbish including dead livestock near Euroa has raised the ire of Strathbogie Shire Councillor and Goulburn Broken CMA Board member Mick Williams.

The dumping of rubbish including dead livestock near Euroa has raised the ire of Strathbogie Shire Councillor and Goulburn Broken CMA Board member Mick Williams.

Cr Williams said following the complaints of a grazier he investigated and found three dead calves, drums of farm chemicals and household rubbish dumped in a roadside depression that contained water flowing to the Seven Creeks.

Shire workers removed the carcases and rubbish from the roadside just east of Euroa.

Strathbogie Shire, joined with the Goulburn Broken CMA and the EPA in condemning illegal dumping which is an offence under the Environment Protection Act.

Goulburn Broken CMA Chair Stephen Mills said the chemicals and rotting stock may have impacted on water quality in the Seven Creeks.

He urged the community to think of the environment and reconsider illegal dumping.

“Enormous amounts of time and money have been invested in the Seven Creeks undertaking research and works to protect a population of endangered native Trout Cod found in its waters,’’ Mr Mills said.

“It’s disappointing to see the work of so many potentially undermined by these actions,’’ he said.

Mr Mills said dumped rubbish was unsightly, impacted on tourism and the appeal of the environment, could harm native plants and animals and damage natural ecosystems. Money spent on clean ups could be better spent on restoring waterways and bush land.

He urged people not to use creeks, remnant bush and roadsides as a dumping ground.

“This is not the legacy we want to leave to future generations,’’ Mr Mills said.

EPA Victoria acting North East regional manager Colin McIntosh said “It is important that downstream stock are protected from potential diseases transmitted from dead and decaying animals.

Mr McIntosh encouraged farmers to consider other options for disposal.

‘‘In areas where a knackery service is unavailable or when stock are unsuitable for pet food they should be disposed of by burial,” Mr McIntosh said.

“Our waterways are a precious resource and need to be protected. If farmers are unsure about their stock disposal options, I urge them to contact us.”

*Farmers seeking further information on the correct disposal of dead animals are encouraged to contact EPA’s Wangaratta Office on 5721 7277 or their local Animal Health Officer with the Department of Primary Industries.

Release ends

For more information telephone Lisa McKenzie 0427212651