Valley

Honeysuckle control program on the Yea River kicks off again

Monday 5 December, 2016
The community, Murrindindi Shire Council and the Goulburn Broken CMA are continuing to work together to control honeysuckle along the Yea River.
Controlling honeysuckle helps native species bounce back

At a recent meeting the Yea CFA raised its concerns about the possible fire risk posed by dead honeysuckle vines in trees along the Marshbank Street and the Yea wetlands river frontage. The dead honeysuckle is a result of control works carried out during previous summers.

“It was determined that a follow up spray of this persistent weed needed to occur before pulling down the dead material from the trees, to ensure any new growth was not spread further with the removal of dead vines,” Goulburn Broken CMA River Health Officer Christine Glassford said.

 “Council had already investigated this issue and committed to funding a contractor to spray the new growth in this stretch of stream. We’re really pleased too, that the local Green Army team, co-ordinated by the Upper Goulburn Landcare Network, will help reduce the fire risk by pulling down the dead plant material after respraying occurs. The Yea Wetland’s committee will carry out similar works on the opposite bank.”

 Ms Glassford said the results of a community survey undertaken a couple of years ago highlighted ongoing concern about the presence of weeds along the Yea River, in particular, honeysuckle.

 “We’ve carried out control works during the previous couple of summers, and importantly, many landholders have signed agreements to continue with honeysuckle management. We appreciate their efforts and encourage them to keep tackling any regrowth to ensure the investment in control efforts to date are worthwhile.”

 Goulburn Broken CMA will also undertake further honeysuckle control at the other end of town near Providence Bridge, starting December 12.

 “We’ve been in touch with landholders downstream of the bridge to let them know contractors will be tackling previously inaccessible honeysuckle. We’re also aiming to follow up on spraying out regrowth within the upstream unlicensed frontage. Working together to listen and act on community concerns about weed control while minimising fire risk is a great outcome for everyone. Collectively we can eradicate this environmental weed from town.”

 The Hooray for the Yea project, funded by the Victorian Government and delivered by the Goulburn Broken CMA, aims to improve the river’s health and support native fish populations, particularly of threatened species such as the Macquarie Perch, through on-ground works and continuing community involvement.

 Ms Glassford reminded landholders with river frontage that funding support was also available to protect and enhance the river banks by carrying out revegetation and fencing works.

 To find out more about the Hooray for the Yea and other Goulburn Broken CMA programs please click here.