Bird

Grants available for Landholders living on the Broken River and its tributaries

Wednesday 25 January, 2006
Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Authority Vegetation Officers are spreading the word on how landholders can tap into grants to improve river health and improve their properties at the same time.

Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Authority Vegetation Officers are spreading the word on how landholders can tap into grants to improve river health and improve their properties at the same time.

Landholders willing to undertake protection or enhancement works along waterways could be eligible for funding from the GBCMA. Works subsidised by the CMA include:

  • Fencing - to manage stock access to the waterway to improve water quality and reduce bank erosion.
  • Stock watering – where fencing restricts stock from the waterway, stock troughs or dams can be installed in paddocks adjacent to waterway.
  • Revegetation activities – planting/direct seeding of indigenous species to improve the stream environment.

Additional subsidies available for irrigated properties include:

  • Fencing and revegetation;
  • Building or enlarging drainage re-use systems ;
  • Automatic flood irrigation systems; and
  • Whole farm plans for horticulture and broadacre properties.

Waterways Officers Rebecca Nicoll and Jim Castles work with landowners throughout the Benalla district to provide advice and support on management of waterway frontages.

Ms Nicoll and Mr Castles along with four other Waterways Officers will be making contact and working closely with residents along the Broken River and its tributaries in the coming weeks.

The Broken River is a priority waterway in the Goulburn Broken Catchment because of its high environmental, economic and social value.

Rebecca has been working with landholders to protect and enhance native vegetation for the past five years. She is passionate about the area and loves her work.

“On the plains you get the most stunning sunrises and sunsets, magnificent gnarly old red gums and beautiful spring flowers,” Ms Nicoll said.

“I’ve developed a keen interest in native fish and been involved in projects to highlight the plight of the endangered Trout Cod population in the Seven Creeks around Gooram.”

She said she loves to hear feedback from landholders who have taken on waterway grants on their properties. She said they often speak proudly about how their native seedlings are progressing.

“CMA staff and landholders share a passion for rivers and creeks,” Ms Nicoll said.

“The CMA is responsible for managing river health for the whole community and in some instances, we need to better understand the issues the landholder is trying to manage at the farm scale.

“When we both approach the issues together with goodwill, we are able to find a balance.”

Mr Castles has been working for the GBCMA Waterways and Biodiversity Programs for three years and is providing landholders with information on grants designed for irrigated properties.

“It is great to see the changes that have occurred in our landscape due to on ground works. There are some excellent examples of this around the Benalla area,” Mr Castles said.

“The Regent Honeyeater Project at Lurg and the Heartlands Project in the Goomalibee area have resulted in massive landscape change for the greater good.

“I would love to see similar results with the waterway grants project.

“If we can offer landholders financial assistance and advice to increase productivity and efficiency while protecting or enhancing the natural features on their property we all benefit.”

Grants are also available to landholders living on the Goulburn River. The aim of the project is to improve the overall health of the Broken and Goulburn Rivers now and for future generations.

For more information on how to apply for a grant, contact the GBCMA: Rebecca Nicoll or Jim Castles on 57 611 611 or visit the website /