Turtle

Floods bring life back to the catchment

Thursday 16 September, 2010
The recent flooding of the Goulburn and Broken river systems has brought back a wealth of life to the catchment and major gains to river and floodplain environments. "While the farmers have praised the rain and some communities have battled with its impacts, waterways and floodplains throughout the region will benefit immensely from the floods of recent weeks," said the Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Authority CEO Chris Norman this week.

The recent flooding of the Goulburn and Broken river systems has brought back a wealth of life to the catchment and major gains to river and floodplain environments.
"While the farmers have praised the rain and some communities have battled with its impacts, waterways and floodplains throughout the region will benefit immensely from the floods of recent
weeks," said the Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Authority CEO Chris Norman this week.

"The region's agencies (particularly Vic SES and local government) and community members need to be congratulated on their planning and management during the recent events, as without their leadership it could have been devastating, with nearly all our towns situated within floodplain areas," Mr Norman added.

Although flooding can have a dramatic impact on our community, it is a natural event with huge environmental benefits.

Following over ten years of low rainfall and dry creek beds the rivers will now benefits from the recent rainfall and flooding. This is typical of the boom and bust situations in Australian landscape, an environment that moves through cycles of drought to flooding rains.

The rain and floodwater will make many of our creeks and wetlands come to life over the coming weeks and months. Flood flows will move sediment and algae and the freshwater ecosystems respond accordingly. Many streams, their plants and animals, will benefit for a number of years ahead.

Rivers are being stimulated already with native fish in local streams and wetlands presently breeding. In the coming months floodplain vegetation will come to life and the floodwaters will suppress many weeds species. Iconic fish species, like the Macquarie perch and Murray cod, will be presented with conditions favourable for breeding events, which will benefit the recovery of native fish throughout the region.

The benefits of natural floods almost certainly outweigh the negative impacts, in the longer term.

For further information please contact the Goulburn Broken CMA on 03 5820 1100.