Bird

Breathing life back into our rivers

Monday 25 October, 2010
While the farmers have praised the rain and some communities are still dealing with the damage, local fish, bugs and birds have been re-energized since the recent flood events.

While the farmers have praised the rain and some communities are still dealing with the damage, local fish, bugs and birds have been re-energized since the recent flood events.

Recent surveys undertaken by Arthur Rylah Institute along the Goulburn River, on behalf of the Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Authority (CMA), has found some exciting short term results.

"We found during the high flows that fish like Golden Perch and Murray Cod used this opportunity to move onto the floodplain and feed on an abundant supply of worms and other food in these areas"

says Wayne Tennant, Goulburn Broken CMA Strategic River Health Manager.

"Since the high flows, the river has been teeming with aquatic life, especially macro-invertebrates, which will provide another important food source for our native fish stocks" explains Mr Tennant.

Rivers in the catchment have been stimulated by the flows resulting in native fish in local streams and wetlands presently breeding.

In the coming months floodplain vegetation and wildlife will flourish as the floodwaters recede. It is hoped that favourable conditions will remain for some time for breeding events, which will benefit the recovery of native fish throughout the region.

Previous research has shown many large native fish species have high recruitment rates during flood events. The CMA is encouraged by recent surveys and has an expectation that increased numbers of native fish will be found in local waterways in the years to come.

The Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Authority is supporting monitoring and implementation of works to protect threatened fish communities throughout the catchment.

For further information contact the Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Authority on 03 5820 1100.