Wheat

Artificial pools constructed in Broken

Thursday 29 January, 2009
Nine artificial habitat pools within the Broken and Boosey Creeks are being established as a trial to see if they can help maintain threatened aquatic species during dry periods.

Nine artificial habitat pools within the Broken and Boosey Creeks are being established as a trial to see if they can help maintain threatened aquatic species during dry periods.

Mark Turner River Health Implementation Project Coordinator said that these pools have been created as a result of the commissioning of the new Tungamah Stock and Domestic pipeline and they will be a much needed refuge for a number of birds, mammals, amphibians and fish.

"The creeks were used to deliver water to stock and landholders in the area and it is now serviced by the pipeline therefore less water flows down the creeks particularly during summer.

"Significant sections of both the Broken and Boosey Creeks now receive a more natural flow regime because of the pipeline," said Mr Turner.

Neville Atkinson from the Yorta Yorta Nation Aboriginal Corporation said a Yorta Yorta traditional owner's heritage approval process for the project was needed before works could take place.

"This has seen a number of new sites registered and protected during the establishment of pools," said Mr Atkinson.

Funding for the project has been made available from the State Government of Victoria's "Large Scale River Restoration Program" and implemented by contractors at the direction of the GBCMA. Assistance has also been provided by the adjacent landholders to the sites and also Parks Vic as managers of the State park in this area.

As part of this project Monash University will monitor the habitat pools over the next few years to establish how effective the pools are in providing refuge.

Release Ends

For more information or a photo opportunity please contact:

Mark Turner at GB CMA on 5820 1100
Stacey Brauman at Impress Publicity on 0400 644 637